Documonials: true stories from the trenches

Our clients tell their stories in their own words

Video 1: Why Marketing Automation?

Karlene Moore Explains Why She Was Willing To Take This Big Risk

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The Client Situation

Randy:
Tell me, what does your company do?

Karlene:
Our company is a consulting firm.  Our clients are biopharmaceutical companies.  And we essentially provide a variety of services that all relate to commercial strategy.

Randy:
Who is the ideal client for your company?

Karlene:
Our clients are usually mid-to-senior-level decision makers in the biopharmaceutical industry, everything from very small companies to large global entities.  Our clients are trying to prove the clinical and economic value of their products and also maximize access for those products. 

Randy:
So tell me Karlene, how does your company help ideal clients accomplish their goals?

Karlene:
We have health economics and outcomes research services, analysis.  We do market research.  We do epidemiology studies.  So it’s a variety of strategic consulting services. 

Randy:
So what strategies and tactics do you use to connect with ideal clients? 

Karlene:
Our strategies and tactics for connecting with ideal clients are largely focused on demonstrating our expertise.  We do that in live form through conferences and symposiums at the podium.  And we do that on a digital level by creating thought leadership material, such as white papers, case studies and webcasts.

Randy:
How do you use email marketing? 

Karlene:
We use email marketing in a couple of different ways.  We have two different opt-in email newsletters.  One is around US health policy changes.  The other is more focused on the European landscape.  So we have both opt-in consistent newsletter programs and then we also have other email marketing which is targeted by customer segment.  But we’re always tackling topics that we believe are relevant, and timely and are going to help our clients make better decisions about their business and understand the market landscape better.

Randy:
So what’s the size of your marketing department?

Karlene:
Our marketing department consists of myself and we have a senior marketing manager who is our primary user and internal expert on marketing automation software and on the customer relationship management database that obviously is integral to working with that software.  As well as our website and the content management system that functions to support it.

Randy:
So how would you describe the expectations of senior management at your company for the marketing function?  What do they expect from you? 

Karlene:
Our company’s senior management has the same expectations of the marketing function as they do of every other function within the team, within the company, and that is a commitment to excellence and a commitment to partnership.  

Randy:
You did not have to do this implementation.  No one was forcing you to do it.  In fact, when we first started talking, as I recall, you told me that some people from your company said it couldn’t be done.  So why did you take this big risk and decide to make this bold move?

Karlene:
I think that in order to be successful at anything, you have to be willing to take risks.  Doing something new or doing something for the first time does have an element of risk to it.  What drove me to do it was really again the commitment to excellence and partnership that I referenced earlier.  I could see that in the marketplace this had been happening for quite some time.  Many leading companies were using this technology.  It gave them a new level of visibility to how their audiences were engaging with their marketing efforts.  And I wanted to be able to bring that to our organization.

I felt like we had an effective marketing program, but I knew it could be even more effective.  And there were several different steps we need to take in order to make it more effective and one of those was being open to look at new technologies.

Randy:
Please describe for me the tools and processes that you had in place to deliver marketing services say about a year ago. 

Karlene:
We had and still have a CRM for our database contact management.  We also used Google Analytics to try to get an idea for patterns and utilization on our website.  We had a separate tool which really was just for building and sending emails.  We used that tool to look at the response of our audience to those specific emails, but it really only allowed us to see on an email-by-email basis what particular response rates looked like. 

And then we had to try to go into our CRM in order to cross reference utilization and look at engagement on a more topical level.  No matter how much data crunching we did between various different systems, the one piece of visibility that we never had was a complete digital footprint on an individual user level. 

So we were never able to see, for example, John Doe and what John Doe’s specific behavior was and his specific engagement across our website and with our newsletter or with specific emails that were not opt-in.  We were never really able to look at what an individual was interested in and what his or her patterns of behavior were in downloading media, reading case studies, in looking at specific pages on our website and correlate what those patterns look like longitudinally.  

Randy:
So what was wrong with them?  What did you find inadequate about those tools?

Karlene:
The primary challenge we had with them is that they weren’t integrated.  In and of themselves they gave us good information.  But because they weren’t integrated, we couldn’t see the total picture.  And without seeing the total picture, we really weren’t able to make a complete and accurate assessment of what was going on and then be able to make recommendations to our management team on what we should do differently and what we should do next in order to achieve different results.